Photo Tips Go Now
Glamour, Beauty, Nude, Models, Photographers

*    |  Register  


 
Go Back   Garage Glamour™ > Garage Glamour™ Main Forums > Tech Talk Forum
 

Tech Talk Forum Photography & Technical Related Only!

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
My challenge needs your expert advice
Old 06-23-2003, 09:41 AM   #1 (permalink)
Free Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Member GG#: 36040
Location: Lebanon
Posts: 7
Comments: 0

jenk is offline IP: 65.27.128.43
 
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote

First of all, I stumbled on to this site last week, and I haven't left since. Tons of beautiful people, great work, good information, a class environment. [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/cool.gif[/img] Seems like a good place to solicit some basic advice for meeting a particular challenge coming up next week.

I've rented a beach house with a pool on St George Island, on Florida's panhandle coast, for the annual family vacation. Never been there yet, so I'm excited about checking out a new place. Been going over my supplies, strategies, and pretrip planning to get good, saveable images of all types - naturescapes, people, things....whatever, just about anything other than glamour.

For many years I've tried to engage in the art of crafting glamorous photography, but my only model has been the spouse unit, and more often than not we're not on the same wavelength as to what the optimum photoshoot experience should be like. Many a romantic getaway has been rendered less romantic by the intrusion of the lens. [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/confused.gif[/img] I'm not interested in launching a new career or boldly going where no photographer has gone before; I just want to make the best photographs I can in any given situation, and regain the confidence to keep making good photos. When I take poor pictures, my model loses more confidence and thinks the whole experience is a waste of time. [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/blush.gif[/img]

Among the genres of glamour, my predeliction is towards wetlook. Playboy's Wet and Wild series is great stuff. Not only is a wet blouse a turn-on, from a technical point of view wet material easily masks the imperfections of the slightly Rubenesque form of my model/unit. So most of our "sessions" have involved a hot tub or pool, and of course our vacaton location will provide several different kinds of wetlook opportunities...but I had decided not to go down that avenue this time, lest I tear the thin fabric of her universe.

Sorry for the digression...to cut to the matter at hand, I was surprised this weekend when my model said that one night next week, after our son and the mother-in-law have gone to bed, she wants to stage a shoot with all the trappings: candles, champagne, soft music, the works. I know she's serious 'cause she even bought a wig! and some other "surprises." All she asks of me is to take some good pictures for once. [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/shocked.gif[/img]

So the conditions are: pool at night, some candlelight, probably some big bug candles or torches as well. I don't know yet about pool lights or porch-mounted spotlights. I have a socket on a clamp with a reflector that I could use for some kind of illumination, too. My tools are my original Pentax K1000 from 20 years ago and a small top mounted flash unit, but I don't even have a meter, or whitebalancing cards, or any of that jazz. I also have an 80-250 mm zoom. I also have a Hewlett-Packard C618 digital camera.

So is that enough information to ask what my strategy should be to get some good exposures? How should I best use that reflector clamp? Will the flash just wash everything out but two red eyes and I'd be better off not using it? Will I be able to capture the warmth of candlelight without overpowering it with other sources? Is this doomed to fail? [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/crazy.gif[/img]

Like I indicated, I'm not expecting my limited experience to produce pro-quality results; the main enjoyment will be in the very act of doing it. But I would like to get some keepers, and if I should get very lucky and get one great one, I'll be eternally grateful to the Photo Gods. And to anyone here who can offer up some concise, usable advice. Thanks.

Any advice for the spouse/model would be useful, too.
  View Public Profile Send a private message to jenk Find More Posts by jenk
 
That\'s a big bite.
Old 06-23-2003, 10:32 AM   #2 (permalink)
**DONOTDELETE**
Guest
 
Member GG#:
Posts: n/a
Comments:

IP: 165.95.207.169
 
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote

To prevent choking, here's a few suggestions.

First, be aware that digital cameras don't function real well in low light environments. While they can be used, you might want to experiment with some non-model shots under simulated conditions, prior to the real thing.

Second, candles alone don't provide a lot of light spread. You will find that adding some Tiki torches, or other type compatible overall illumination, can help a lot, in the shadows.

Third, use a tripod if at all possible. Introduction of camera movement will be a tough problem to overcome, handheld.

Fourth, if the figure isn't perfect, then be very careful about focal length, and use the right focal length for the right shot. Example: 85mm will be nice for 3/4-full lengths. Yet, if you go in close, 135mm would be better.

Fifth, use the widest aperature you can on your lenses, to allow the candles and other light sources to spread, with minimal depth of field.

Finally, focus critically, to be sure you have as sharp an image as possible under difficult conditions, and if using zooms, watch out for zoom "creep", if you let go of the lens after focusing.

Hope that will be of some help. [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]
 
 
Re: Rick has definitly been there!
Old 06-23-2003, 03:53 PM   #3 (permalink)
Lifetime Photographer
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Member GG#: 35829
Location: San Antonio
Posts: 52
Comments: 0

hlmphotog is offline IP: 152.163.253.33
 
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote

Wow! Sounds like she has more in store for you than a couple of pictures! Rick's advice is really good advice...have fun first, and worry about the rest later. If you must get technical, here are a few from the BTDTs:
1. Anything that will reflect light will work...mirors, sheets, etc. I still use an 8x4 foot insulation panel you can pick up for under ten bucks at any building supply store. They are covered with something like tin foil on one side and make a great refelctor.
2. The trick to candle light photography is understanding "dragging the shutter" The thing to remember about low light and flash photography is that your exposure for ambient light is controled by shutter speed and exposure for flash is controled by your Fstop. I don't know if you can do this with your digital or not. Meter for your shot as though you were going to photograph the candles. Unless you are using really high speed film, your shutter speed should be slower than your maximum sync speed.
3. Now that you know you will get a good exposure on the candle light, increase the shutter speed by one stop so that the ambient light is slightly under exposed. Look at your Fstop and if it what you want to use for the shot ok, if not regroup.
4. Set your flash to give you the exposure you want at that Fstop. Be careful that your flash does not overwhelm your subject. Couple of tricks are, you can put a white handkerchief over the flash or redirect the flash into a panel and light your subject indirectly. Another trick for candle light is put a piece of plan old window screen in front of the lens and you will get nice four point stars in the candle flame.
5. I would bracket these shots, because you have no way to meter other than through your camera...say three shots on either side of metered ranging from -3 to +3 stops. You might get luckey and come up with a winner! Have fun...don't let that camera detract from the moment, and make sure you keep the reassuring, soft, warm chatter going the whole time...

  View Public Profile Send a private message to hlmphotog Visit hlmphotog's homepage! Find More Posts by hlmphotog
 
Candle shoots
Old 06-23-2003, 07:17 PM   #4 (permalink)
RBP
Guest
 
Member GG#:
Posts: n/a
Comments:

IP: 216.192.182.2
 
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote

First rule, never to be broken... if the candles are ANYWHERE near the model, you need a third party standing by in case of a flare up. He/she watches nothing but the model's hair, clothes, and flame, for safety's sake. On this shoot with Ivy, she moved suddendly, and pushed her hair into one of the candles and poof! Mr. Fireman had to jump in.



Second rule - candles should be a prop and an accent, and not a primary light source. You can almost never really light the image by pure candlelight, even with this shoot where I had over 200 candles lit... most just inches from the model. The dynamic range from shadow to the flame is just to large. If you open up enough to have suffcient ligh on the model, the candles themselves are way blown out highlights.

You need to add additional artificial light. Incandescents are fine, and close in color balance to candles. I just use the modeling lights on by regular strobe heads, and bounce them into unbrellas.

This picture of Ivy (below) the cancdles give the glow to the face, but overhead incandescents in umbrellas light the rest of her.... otherwise the wide dynamic range would make the rest of her face very, very dark and very, very orange.



Set the exposure so you get the right sized glow from the candles, then add incandescent light to themodel to balance it.

A good example is the crypt scene from Romeo and Juliet (the one a few years ago with Claire Danes).

Here is one more.. the candles supply the forelight, but the room is filly lit with incandescents, and provides the fill.



 
 
Re: That\'s a big bite.
Old 06-24-2003, 08:23 AM   #5 (permalink)
Free Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Member GG#: 36040
Location: Lebanon
Posts: 7
Comments: 0

jenk is offline IP: 65.27.128.43
 
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote

Yes, a tripod will definitely be used with the digital. I wasted several (non-glamour) less-than-perfect lighting opportunities when I first got the unit, thinking, "This digital stuff is crap" before figuring out that I needed to make some adjustments from my film mindset.

Good thoughts, thanks for posting.
  View Public Profile Send a private message to jenk Find More Posts by jenk
 
Re: Rick has definitly been there!
Old 06-24-2003, 08:30 AM   #6 (permalink)
Free Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Member GG#: 36040
Location: Lebanon
Posts: 7
Comments: 0

jenk is offline IP: 65.27.128.43
 
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote

I liked your 'dragging the shutter' explanation. Thanks for taking the time to go through that.
  View Public Profile Send a private message to jenk Find More Posts by jenk
 
Re: Candle shoots
Old 06-24-2003, 08:36 AM   #7 (permalink)
Free Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Member GG#: 36040
Location: Lebanon
Posts: 7
Comments: 0

jenk is offline IP: 65.27.128.43
 
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote

Very nice examples....stressing the color match with incandescents is key. Thanks
  View Public Profile Send a private message to jenk Find More Posts by jenk
 
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Post Processing challenge #2 ... R_Fredrick_Smith Main Community Forum 20 12-08-2007 01:53 PM
Lighting advice questions Jpelham Tech Talk Forum 1 02-20-2007 03:53 PM
Advice on shooting Fashion. Foto_Highway Tech Talk Forum 5 04-28-2005 11:44 PM
Advice for outdoor swimwear shoot Austin Tech Talk Forum 1 07-14-2003 11:54 AM

Sponsors


New To Site? Need Help? Photographer & Model Links
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:20 AM.

© 1999-2017 Garage Glamour™




Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.2.0

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93