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home studio setups
Old 05-26-2005, 12:32 AM   #1 (permalink)
vrdude
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Hi all, I am just starting off in portrait photography and found this site.
Great info and learning tools. I am wanting to set up a home studio I have a space 4 metres by 6 metres and 7ft ceiling.
I noticed this post by mike which was very helpful in setup and configurations
Mikes thread
I was hoping a few more of you would have overall photos of your smaller studio setups to help me decide on how to setup mine.
I currently have a nikon d70 and sb600 flash and two tripods, any suggestions on starter equipment would be very helpful as well.
Cheers.
 
 
Re: home studio setups
Old 05-26-2005, 01:54 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Cicada is offline IP: 66.215.183.2
 
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i'm also interested. +favorite
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Small spaces
Old 05-26-2005, 02:55 AM   #3 (permalink)
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For years I had access to a full blown commercial studio, (it had 7 full blown sets in it) the owner had to close the place and I had to improvise.... so home to my working garage I went. I still shoot just about anything I want, but it takes a bit more planning because of the limited space... if portrait work is your main goal you don't need much in my opinion..... I was cutting off about 18" from 9' paper rolls till I came to the conclusion all I needed was 53"'s. I've been producing up to 16x20's from the narrow paper now the last year....




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Re: Small spaces
Old 05-26-2005, 05:56 AM   #4 (permalink)
vrdude
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Thanx Michael, great info really helpful to see the backdrop setup on the roof, I am new to the whole backdrop thing as I have traditionally done vr work and real estate photography in the past.
 
 
Re: Small spaces
Old 05-26-2005, 10:51 AM   #5 (permalink)
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I went from shooting in a room that was 16x30 with 13 foot ceilings, to shooting in a much smaller space...

Where I shoot now, I only have about 12 feet by 15 feet.

To say it is cramped, is an understatement. I'm basically limited to shooting headshots, waist up shots, or maybe somebody scrunched up in a chair.

However, even with those limitations, you can still get some decent shots in cramped quarters.

Tips: Try to have the model as far away as possible from any backdrop. Even a couple of feet more of seperation can make a difference.

Try to avoid spill from your main light onto the backdrop to avoid harsh shadows.

You can take some really nice shots with nothing more than a single big softbox and a hairlight.

Whether you are in a big studio or small, you still have to control the light.

Even with the severe limitations I shoot under, I still get respectable shots.

I do miss my big shooting room though......

Bigger is always better, but don't let a limitation in space be an excuse for shooting poor shots.

I've seen some shots a friend of mine takes on his front porch. He uses the porch to block harsh daytime light, sets a light up facing out towards the street, and uses a longer lens and stands in his doorway.

Because the background (trees) are all the way across the street, and with the constrained cropping, you would think he shot them in a park or something.

I've seen some cool shots on here I think J.T. posted and he actually shot a girl sitting inside the front seat of a car with the window open.

They are close ups and you wouldn't beleive that they were shot anywhere else but a studio.

Learning to use the space and area you have available will come in handy if and when you graduate to a larger place.

Mark
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