Lens Diaries Go Now
Glamour, Beauty, Nude, Models, Photographers

*    |  Register  


 
Go Back   Garage Glamour™ > Garage Glamour™ Main Forums > Main Community Forum
 

Main Community Forum General Modeling & Photography Forum
Adult posts prohibited!>>Please Read Our GUIDELINES before posting!

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
film selection
Old 02-12-2007, 12:53 AM   #1 (permalink)
Free Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Member GG#: 38174
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 12
Comments: 0
Send a message via AIM to biggame248

biggame248 is offline IP: 64.12.116.207
 
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote

what is the best film and speed to get for glamour for outside and inside?
Kevin
  View Public Profile Send a private message to biggame248 Find More Posts by biggame248
 
Re: film selection
Old 02-12-2007, 01:12 AM   #2 (permalink)
Free Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Member GG#: 38174
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 12
Comments: 0
Send a message via AIM to biggame248

biggame248 is offline IP: 64.12.116.205
 
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote

is slide film better than regular film?
  View Public Profile Send a private message to biggame248 Find More Posts by biggame248
 
Re: film selection
Old 02-12-2007, 01:35 AM   #3 (permalink)
Evangelical Ne'er-do-well

 
ChipBulgin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Member GG#: 42306
Location: Severna Park, MD
Posts: 482
Comments: 0
Send a message via Yahoo to ChipBulgin

ChipBulgin is offline IP: 68.55.248.119
 
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote

Are you going to scan it/have it scanned?

-Chip
__________________
People who do stupid things with dangerous substances often die! -me
  View Public Profile Send a private message to ChipBulgin Find More Posts by ChipBulgin
 
Re: film selection
Old 02-12-2007, 01:50 AM   #4 (permalink)
Lifetime Photographer

 
Paul54's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Member GG#: 46366
Location: Alpharetta
Posts: 94
Comments: 0

Paul54 is offline IP: 68.219.170.127
 
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote

I used to use Fuji Astia 100 slide for indoor studio photo shoot, because it gives the best skin color. Outdoors, I use Fuji Provia 100 for all around color.
  View Public Profile Send a private message to Paul54 Find More Posts by Paul54
 
Re: film selection
Old 02-12-2007, 07:22 AM   #5 (permalink)
Free Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Member GG#: 38174
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 12
Comments: 0
Send a message via AIM to biggame248

biggame248 is offline IP: 152.163.100.65
 
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote

scan it
  View Public Profile Send a private message to biggame248 Find More Posts by biggame248
 
Re: film selection
Old 02-12-2007, 10:57 AM   #6 (permalink)
Free Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Member GG#: 46114
Location: San Antonio
Posts: 120
Comments: 0

dledeaux is offline IP: 70.244.248.134
 
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote

Depends on the situation of course

I was shooting Fuji NPS 160 for a while. I like it for a negative film but really prefer to shoot slide. For slide I was starting to really get into Sensia. Provia was too expensive for the type of shooting I was doing, but I was shooting a lot of Velvia for nature and landscapes.
  View Public Profile Send a private message to dledeaux Visit dledeaux's homepage! Find More Posts by dledeaux
 
Re: film selection
Old 02-12-2007, 11:41 AM   #7 (permalink)
Free Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Member GG#: 35772
Location: Barrie
Posts: 33
Comments: 0

LesHoward is offline IP: 24.36.123.139
 
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote

My preference is the pro transparency film Fuji Provia 100 (RDP) both indoors & out. I like it because of it's fine grain, high acutance, neutral color and medium speed. I've also used a lot of Sensia 100 which Fuji says is the same thing but in an amateur load.

The difference is that the pro load is only marketed through dealers who have the proper facilities to refrigerate it until it's sold. The photographer is also expected to refrigerate it until about an hour before they use it, then have it processed at a pro lab right away. This is the way to go for critical work like advertising & fashion.

The amateur films you can buy almost anywhere. I've even seen them in dollar stores. However I suggest buying them at a reputable camera store. They cost considerably less than the equivalent pro films. To make them last longer, refrigerate them at home. This is the way to go when you want to take film on vacations, canoe trips (in my case) or where the exact color is not criical (eg. landscapes, model shoots).

Both these films can be scanned.

Les Howard
  View Public Profile Send a private message to LesHoward Find More Posts by LesHoward
 
Re: film selection
Old 02-12-2007, 02:50 PM   #8 (permalink)
Lifetime Photographer

 
BryanJWeitzel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Member GG#: 36463
Location: Columbus
Posts: 49
Comments: 0

BryanJWeitzel is offline IP: 165.138.56.58
 
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote

I use Kodak Portra 160 VC or the Fuji NPS 160 for color print film. I tend to like the Kodak better for models and Fuji for landscapes.

B&W I use Ilford Delta 100.

Slides I use Sensia since my lab stocks it in the fridge just like the Provia. I used to use slide film a lot more before things got so digital. I even have my own slide scanner. But nowadays my lab can get fairly good quality scans off color print film at the time of processing for about $2 a roll plus $7 for the CD. That's really attractive when you're looking at an hour per roll of film scanning it yourself so you can fulfill a TFCD agreement. And a quality scan at the lab for the keepers are far better than I can do in my office.
__________________
"It's worse than that. He's dead, Jim" -- Dr. McCoy, aka "Bones"

Bryan.
  View Public Profile Send a private message to BryanJWeitzel Visit BryanJWeitzel's homepage! Find More Posts by BryanJWeitzel
 
Re: film selection
Old 02-12-2007, 10:18 PM   #9 (permalink)
Evangelical Ne'er-do-well

 
ChipBulgin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Member GG#: 42306
Location: Severna Park, MD
Posts: 482
Comments: 0
Send a message via Yahoo to ChipBulgin

ChipBulgin is offline IP: 68.55.248.119
 
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote

There are several ways to go, but I'd choose a film in the 100-160 ISO range. As far as film goes, you're basically going to turn it into a digital image. So what you start with doesn't matter so much. You can select a film based on other properties.

The big benefit to using slide film is that it's easy to match the scan to the original. You know right away whether or not the scan matches. But slide film can be difficult to scan. Films like Fuji Velvia and Provia have a maximum density (D-max) approaching 4.0. That's nearly a 10,000 : 1 contrast ratio. Getting all that density range scanned properly into something you can use and manipulate can be tough. You also need to be spot-on with your metering. Overexposure leads to blown highlights and too much underexposure leads to muddy shadows. But when you get the exposure right the results can be stunning. If you're unsure about the exposure, bracket your shots and favor slight underexposure to keep your highlights in check.

Color negative film has more exposure latitude than color positive (slide) film. It's more forgiving of exposure error. About the only thing you have to worry about is underexposure, in which case you'll lose your shadow detail. Overexposure of color negative film can give you different effects: more color saturation, subtle color shifts, and the like. I know several photographers who deliberately overexpose color negative film because they like the results they get. If you're unsure about exposure, it's always better to favor slight overexpose so as to ensure you have shadow detail. But color negative film has a tint to its film base, and each film has a slightly different tint. You have to correct your scans to account for this tint (or your lab does) in order to get accurate color.

Film is a personal preference, so you'll get a different opinion from each person you talk to. For most of my professional work I use Fuji Provia 100F. (a slide film). Fuji has 3 professional slide film families: Astia, Provia, and Velvia. Astia is the least saturated and has about a 1/2 stop more exposure latitude than the other two. It gives neutral colors and skin tones, but I find it to be a little on the greenish side.

Provia has punchier, though still accurate, colors and good skin tone. From a grain standpoint, it's the finest grained film you can find. The combination of color and skin tone make it my favorite. But a friend of mine (an Astia shooter) finds it a little too blue for his taste - remember what I said about personal opinions? For glamour work you should find either of these two more than acceptable. Try a roll or two of each and see what you think.

Velvia is uber-saturated. The colors and contrast are very strong and skin tones aren't particularly accurate - they come out very red. These properties make it a great film for landscapes or subjects where you want to emphasize color. But its not a great film for photographing people.

On the color-negative side of the fence, a lot of your success depends on the lab you use to process and scan the film. Both Kodak and Fuji make great films in different contrast emulsions. Kodak has Portra 160NC (normal contrast) and 160VC (more contrast). Fuji has 160S (standard contrast) and 160C (enhanced contrast). The lab I use is dialed in specifically to process and scan Kodak films with great accuracy, so I use that when I'm shooting negs. But if you ever shoot in a mixed lighting environment, Fuji films do a better job with color balance in adverse conditions. They have a 4th. emulsion layer that is particularly effective at reducing the color casts caused by fluorescent lighting.

I prefer shooting slides because there's no chance of mis-interpreting the scan. If it doesn't match the original then it's wrong. But you have to be more deliberate and methodical with it. From an exposure standpoint, negative film is easier to use due to it's greater exposure latitude. But on the processing end you have to trust that everything is calibrated correctly. Inspecting the negative for good density is trivial, but you really need to know how the emulsion is supposed to look in order to interpret colors.

-Chip
__________________
People who do stupid things with dangerous substances often die! -me
  View Public Profile Send a private message to ChipBulgin Find More Posts by ChipBulgin
 
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Film Vs Digital mray Tech Talk Forum 41 11-02-2011 11:28 AM
Tech question - Film - darkroom / in camera - HDR c_canade' Tech Talk Forum 2 05-15-2008 08:59 PM
Canon Film Camera Development RIP jimmyd Main Community Forum 3 05-25-2006 03:36 PM
Film...we don't need no stinkin film!! kjtw Main Community Forum 2 02-06-2006 11:03 AM
The woes of Cropping Antwan Tech Talk Forum 20 08-31-2005 05:26 PM

Sponsors


New To Site? Need Help? Photographer & Model Links
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:23 PM.

© 1999-2017 Garage Glamour™




Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.2.0

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93