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Longer shutter speed equals added saturation
Old 12-30-2005, 12:02 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Tonight I was taking pictures in the studio (of a chair...soooo boring) with two strobes to learn what the difference between shooting at f/11@60th compared to f/11@2sec...dropping the shutter speed with strobes. I once heard that 'it doesn't matter as long as it is equal or below the cameras/lights sync speed' ...which is almost true but I knew it wasn't fully when eveyrone professional seemed to be shooting at 90th or 60th when everything sync'ed at 180-250.

I came to the conclusion that the longer the shutter is open the more saturation of color I got. (DUH since the natural colors would be shining through....wait..isn't that a song?) Okay, so strobe light plus longer exposure (natural light) blend the natural light and strobe color tempratue together. This is so easy to know by the book but SO much more helpful doing it hands on. I feel that I have more control of my camera than I did yesterday. It's always like wrestling a dog, that is also your friend, and learning how to win here and there or I made it hard and it's as "easy as falling off of a log" as Don (Fantasiesimage) would say. Anyhow, of course some things could become blown out and/or blurry with longer exposure time, but it's handy to know everything about your camera. As I have always said growing up with computers..."if you don't learn how it breaks, you can't really learn how it works!"

-joshua


f/11 @ 180th (sync speed of alienbee lights)


f/11 @ 1 sec.
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Re: Longer shutter speed equals added saturation
Old 12-30-2005, 12:49 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Great post, that's been an experiment I've been thinking about for some time. I was also going to lower the aperture (smaller opening) and increase the exposure as another test, not only to see differences in color and shadow, but also get a better feel for DoF.

Of the two pics, which one is closer to reality?

Cheers!
Glenn K.
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Re: Longer shutter speed equals added saturation
Old 12-30-2005, 01:41 AM   #3 (permalink)
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It's a different exposure and hue/white balance with allowing ambient light source to be exposed. This creates the difference in hue. If you used a tripod and shooting still life, nothing is going to move. The theory of dragging the shutter is when you hand hold and if you hand held the one second shot, you truly have a steady hand because I would be almost certain your ambient light became your main exposure. If your ambient was one or two stops below your strobe exposure it will change the hue enough to notice but it looks to me that you basically exposed for the ambient light and that is where your hue difference played into it the most with the different temp. in light. What I am getting at is, I don't think you needed a strobe if that is the hue you prefer.

Now do a test starting at 125th, 60th and so on down the line. Then do time exposure just with your modeling light and no strobe to see the results....

Just talking shop, not being an expert.

J T

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Re: Longer shutter speed equals added saturation
Old 12-30-2005, 01:58 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Turn off ALL of your studio lights (make your studio very dark!) and repeat your experiment and report back to us what you find out, ok?

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not necessarily true...
Old 12-30-2005, 09:53 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Not a true statement, the hue and saturation of the colors in your image are affectd by the ambient light around it in the same room-including the tungsten (3200K) modeling lights in your flash. If you are daylight balanced to your flash, and have a long exposure with strong modeling lamps, they will add "warmth" to your image hues and saturation in your subject. But that would take some longer shutter speeds than 1/60 of a second at ISO 100.

If you have a four-walled studio with no windows and no other light influence, for most speeds the color of the subject will not change as the flash is your shutter speed for your camera. Throw in some ambient light, the flash is still your main shutter speed, but the shutter speed of the camera may allow other light to influence the end result if it's slow--only with ambient light in the room. That's also a technique called "dragging the shutter" and this image is a great example of dragging the shutter to change the color of the skies (background)


Thanks, rg sends!
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Re: Longer shutter speed equals added saturation
Old 12-31-2005, 11:16 AM   #6 (permalink)
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the first was closer i believe. all i had were modeling lights on at the time.
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Re: Longer shutter speed equals added saturation
Old 12-31-2005, 11:19 AM   #7 (permalink)
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I did test at all of the in between shutter speeds and it was a variance between the two the whole time. Other than modeling lights there was one overhead room light on. This is the light that the longer shutter was pickig up. I suppose I could of got the same exposure without strobes if the exposure was much longer.
-joshua
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Re: Longer shutter speed equals added saturation
Old 12-31-2005, 11:22 AM   #8 (permalink)
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I havn't got a chance to do this. I would assume the result would be that the saturation/hue would not change do to other non studio lights interfearing...
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Re: not necessarily true...
Old 12-31-2005, 11:30 AM   #9 (permalink)
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I did have one other light on in the room that was on, so putting that with the strobe temprature I can see how this plays out. I suppose I was only infecting the color of my strobes with another light in the room.

I dragged the shutter in the image below. It's aura borealis from Illinois.

f/3.5 @ 8 Sec.
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